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Commonwealth Games

Commonwealth Games 2022: Why hockey penalty shootouts are different from 'Chak De! India' - Explained

One question that has been asked on the internet in the aftermath of India's bronze medal at the CWG 2022 is why the penalty shootout now is different from the old style immortalised in the 2007 film 'Chak de! India'.

Commonwealth Games 2022: Why hockey penalty shootouts are different from Chak De! India - Explained
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By

Pritish Raj

Updated: 7 Aug 2022 10:32 AM GMT

The Indian women's team just ended a wait of 16 years to clinch the bronze medal at the 2022 Commonwealth Games against New Zealand in a tense penalty shootout as Indian captain Savita Punia stood tall to keep out the Kiwi wave.

One question that has been asked in the aftermath of the match is why the hockey penalty shootout is different from the old style - as has been immortalised in the film 'Chak de! India'.

Hockey has evolved quite rapidly in the last 15 years with the change of timings, the format of the game, few rules and playing conditions.

Whenever Indian fans see a penalty shoot-out in hockey, everyone thinks of the last scene of the Shahrukh Khan-starrer as the Bollywood star plays an estranged coach whose not-so-fancied women's team wins the World Cup defeating the mighty Aussies in the final via a penalty shoot-out.

If you go back and remember, the penalty shoot-out was different from what we saw today against New Zealand.

So what has changed?

'Chak De! India' was released in 2007, when Hockey had a different set of rules among which the penalty shoot-out was different from what it is now.

The penalty shoot-out showed in Chak De! India.

In 2007, Hockey matches were decided by the traditional shoot-out method similarly to football where you place the ball at a spot and the goalkeeper has to save your shot. It was called in penalty stroke method.

However, in 2011, FIH decided to implement the penalty shoot-out method much like Ice Hockey where the attacker will have the chance to go one-on-one against the goalkeeper.

The attack starts at the 23-metre line with the ball and the goalkeeper starts at the goal line. The attacker has 8 seconds to score after the referee blows the whistle and the goalkeeper has to save. There is no restriction on the type of shot being used by the attacker.

If the ball travels out of the field of play or the attacker can't score in those 8 seconds, the goal is not awarded. If the goalkeeper fouls the attacker either the penalty is retaken or a stroke is awarded depending on the nature of the foul.

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